Correct Posture Affects Long Term HealthThere are literally thousands of things we can do to promote a healthy lifestyle. Examples are avoiding to stay up late, drinking plenty of water, eating nutritious foods, doing some exercises on a daily basis, and so much more! That said, most of these routines take a lot of time and effort. Fortunately, there is one thing you can do right now that demands zero effort at all! It is time that you practice proper posture day and night. Did you know that correct posture affects long term health? If there’s a problem with your posture, you should visit a chiropractic clinic. They offer services such as posture realignment for men and women.

How Correct Posture Affects Long Term Health

A good posture is known to be vital in reducing the strain on our muscles, joints, and bones. In addition, it can improve one’s confidence and mood. Standing up straight or sitting in correct posture will probably take some time before it becomes a habit of yours. However, the physical, mental and emotional benefits of a good posture are all worth it.

As per recent studies, there is more to how correct posture affects long term health of a person. As a matter of fact, our body language, which includes the way we present ourselves through posture, influences how others perceive us. Not to mention our moods and habits. In a 2003 research by scientists from the Ohio State University, our posture has an effect to our hormones. For instance, standing tall makes us powerful.

Posture and Combatting Stress and Depression

A research from the University of Francisco showed that practicing correct posture will keep us from depression and stress. In fact, the way we carry ourselves affects our mood and energy levels. Although there are other factors that helped combat depression, a correct posture can come to our aid in our fight against depression.

Another findings from Harvard University and Columbia University illustrated that a bad posture increases our stress levels. Sitting or standing in a slouched position increases the cortisol, which is the hormone associated with stress. In addition, bad posture has an effect on our breathing. A shallow chest breathing puts a strain to our lungs, which then results to overworking our heart.